Early Career Researcher Event

In July 2019 the British Academy of Management and Cranfield School of Management hosted an event focusing on supporting early and middle career researchers in: Alternative Career Options; Resilience and Success in Publishing and Getting Known in Your Field. The event was highly interactive and delegates were encouraged to bring questions to share with the plenary to gain insight from individuals who have excelled in their career.

The different speakers who bestowed their wisdom were:

Session 1: Alternative Career Options – Prof Katie Bailey, Prof Nicholas O’Regan and Prof Sue Vinnicombe

Session 2: Resilience and Publication Success – Prof Pawan Budhwar, Prof Mat Hughes and Prof Helen Shipton

Session 3: How to get known in your field (Prof Emma Parry, Prof Karin Sanders, Prof Mark Saunders)

Employee Voice – Phase 2

The second phase of the centre’s research into employee voice, in partnership with the CIPD, is currently underway. This phase of the research builds on the national survey, conducted in conjunction with YouGov and the CIPD on Employee Voice, which focused on two types of voice, promotive voice (for the purposes of the organization) and human voice (for individuals to express their true feelings). The second phase takes these findings empirical work will investigate the practices and experiences of employee voice within six (or more) case study organizations. This will enable in-depth insights to be generated, examining the organizational practices and experiences of line-managers and employees in how voice works in practice.

This approach helps to fill current gaps in knowledge:

First, the managerial and work-based practices that elicit voice are not clear. In particular, we lack knowledge about what leadership forms foster voice and the way in which formal structures guiding employees’ interactions, such as meetings, might help precipitate voice.

Second, insight is called for regarding why individuals remain silent despite having something to communicate (rather than articulating the reasons for not speaking up). What role do leaders and other contextual influences play in circumventing the tendency of dissatisfied employees to remain silent?

Third what are the innovative practices that organizations are adopting to seek to elicit employee voice, for both promotive and human voice? How do employees experience such practices and what can other organizations learn from such attempts?

The centre will be presenting some initial findings at the Applied Research Conference (CIPD) in January next year.